Learning Opportunities for Providers

  • Module: Breastfeeding: Human Medicine Interprofessional Education (IPE) module.
  • Study: “Breastfeeding Is Associated With a Reduced Maternal Cardiovascular Risk: Systematic Review and Meta‐Analysis Involving Data From 8 Studies and 1 192 700 Parous Women.”
  • Article: “Population-Based Survey Showing That Breastfed Babies Have a Lower Frequency of Risk Factors for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Than Nonbreastfed Babies

Descriptions below

Attention providers and medical professionals: CE credits available for free! The Center for Health Equity, Education, and Research launched the Breastfeeding: Human Medicine Interprofessional Education (IPE) module. Interprofessional Education modules bring nursing, medical, and other professionals in the health field together, stressing the importance of working as a medical team. The free Human Medicine IPE includes breastfeeding scenarios, an interactive Q&A, interviews with health care professionals, and short presentations about breastfeeding. The module can be used by health care providers, lactation counselors, and public health professionals. An Interprofessional Education module brings nursing, medical, and other professionals in the health field together and stresses the importance of working as a medical team. It can also be used by lactation counselors, public health professionals, families, and all breastfeeding supporters. As far as we know, this is the first ever breastfeeding IPE!

The Journal of the American Heart Association published a study titled “Breastfeeding Is Associated With a Reduced Maternal Cardiovascular Risk: Systematic Review and Meta‐Analysis Involving Data From 8 Studies and 1 192 700 Parous Women.” The study systematically reviewed published evidence on the association of breastfeeding with maternal risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcomes. The review found that women who breastfed had a lower risk of future cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease, stroke, and fatal cardiovascular disease.

Breastfeeding Medicine released an article titled “Population-Based Survey Showing That Breastfed Babies Have a Lower Frequency of Risk Factors for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Than Nonbreastfed Babies.” The authors conducted a cross sectional observational study to explore breastfeeding and bed-sharing practices. Based on the results of their study, the authors found a close relationship between breastfeeding and bed-sharing and a lower frequency of SIDS risk factors associated with both practices.

Adapted from information sent in the U.S. Breastfeeding Committee newsletter, the Weekly Wire.